Everest Base Camp Weather

When contemplating a journey to Everest Base Camp, we often receive questions regarding the anticipated weather conditions and amount of rainfall. Although such information is undoubtedly valuable, it merely provides a fraction of the overall picture when it comes to advising climbers on their preparations.

Weather

Long Term (10 Days) Rain Forecast for Nepal

Despite the presence of a unique local weather system in the Himalayas, the most dependable method to anticipate rainfall at Everest Base Camp is by referring to the 10-day precipitation forecast. To gauge the expected rainfall for the upcoming week in relation to typical weather patterns during that time, simply scroll down to the map located at the bottom of this page. The map colour scheme represents normal conditions in white, wetter than normal in blue, and drier than normal in red: http://www.wxmaps.org/outlooks.php 

Temperature and Rainfall at Everest Base Camp by Month

Rainfall at Everest Base Camp by month

Mount Everest Snow Forecast for 6564m

Full Everest Base Camp 6 Day Weather Forecast πŸ‘‰

The overlooked factor that significantly influences how climbers handle the weather at Everest Base Camp is altitude. Unless someone has personally experienced the coldness at high altitudes, it's challenging to effectively convey the true impact of altitude on one's perception of coldness without delving into complex explanations from biologists about how the body reacts to oxygen-deprived environments. Nevertheless, we will attempt to provide a simplified explanation.

Most readers are likely aware that the air's composition at altitude is essentially the same as at sea level, with oxygen comprising slightly less than 20% of the inspired air. However, as individuals ascend, the pressure exerted by the air above them decreases due to the reduced column of air between the outer limits of the Earth's atmosphere and their location. With the diminishing weight of air, the force that holds air molecules together weakens, resulting in thinner, less dense air. In simpler terms, we describe this phenomenon as a decrease in air pressure.

Why Everest Base Camp has only half the oxygen you're used to

Depending on one's location, normal sea level air pressure can be described as 1 atmosphere or 1,000 mbar. As one reaches Everest Base Camp at an elevation of 5,364m, the air pressure typically drops to around 480 - 520 mbar, approximately half of sea level pressure or half an atmosphere. Consequently, the density of the inhaled air at Everest Base Camp is roughly half that of sea level, resulting in approximately half the number of inspired oxygen molecules per breath.

Unless the breathing rate is significantly increased, the body operates with insufficient fuel supply. It may be worth noting that climbers might find it interesting to learn that Diamox (acetazolamide) artificially enhances the respiratory rate by acidifying the blood. This action prompts the chemoreceptors in the neck to signal the hypothalamus, activating the autonomic respiratory system to breathe more frequently and eliminate excess accumulated CO2, ultimately increasing oxygen intake.

However, climbers should also be aware that it is not essential to artificially induce this heightened respiration rate if they understand the requirements. Through practised breath control techniques (non-autonomic), climbers can voluntarily increase their breathing rate. It is important to note that this is not possible during sleep. As long as the climber does not experience an oxygen debt during daytime exposure to the highest elevation of the day, hypoxia is not expected during reduced respiration during sleep.

The Demand for Oxygen in Cold Climates

The thermoregulation process in mammals is highly resource-demanding, particularly in environments with significant deviations from temperate zones. In cold regions, the body relies on an ample oxygen supply to generate heat in the skin, which happens to be the largest organ in the human body. However, due to reduced muscle activity resulting from a limited fuel and oxygen intake, the body fails to produce sufficient heat by-product necessary to maintain the required skin temperature. Consequently, a challenging dilemma arises where our bodies must make a crucial decision between sustaining vital organs (such as the oxygen-hungry brain) with fuel and allocating a significant portion of the scarce oxygen supply to elevate skin temperatures.

The Body's Response to Low Atmospheric Oxygen Levels

As expected, the body's response to these requirements primarily consists of two main aspects: i) significant narrowing of the small blood vessels supplying the skin, with the most noticeable impact occurring in the extremities such as the hands and feet, and ii) reduction in the allocation of resources to processes like digestion and higher brain functions, resulting in decreased IQ and lower fuel demands. Some mountaineers have made claims that are challenging to verify, suggesting that without supplemental oxygen at Everest's summit, the diminished mental capabilities of an average adult are roughly equivalent to those of an average 6-year-old, thereby making complex decision-making nearly impossible.

Therefore, it is crucial for climbers to comprehend that despite the seemingly moderate temperature of minus 8 degrees Celsius that can typically be anticipated at the summit, when coupled with the effects of low oxygen and wind chill, meticulous planning of clothing strategies becomes a matter of utmost importance. We are more than happy to provide guidance and advice on this matter through email correspondence.

Seasonal Weather Patterns at Everest Base Camp 

Everest Base Camp experiences distinct seasonal weather patterns. The most popular climbing seasons are spring (April-May) and autumn (September-October) due to relatively stable weather conditions and milder temperatures. These months offer better visibility and lower risk of storms. Conversely, climbers tend to avoid the summer monsoon season (June-August) and harsh winter (December-February) due to heavy rainfall, high humidity, and extreme cold, making climbing challenging.

MOEV 801
April 2024

On arrival at Tribhuvan International Airport in Kathmandu, once you've passed through Immigration and retrieved your luggage, please look out for your Team Mount Everest driver carrying a placard with your name who will transfer you to Hotel Buddy for overnight on bed and breakfast basis.

ξ…Ÿ
SESH 1501
March 2024

Day 01: Arrive in Kathmandu

ξ…Ÿ
SESH 801
March 2024

On arrival at Tribhuvan International Airport in Kathmandu, once you've passed through Immigration and retrieved your luggage, please look out for your Team Mount Everest driver carrying a placard with your name who will transfer you to Hotel Buddy for overnight on bed and breakfast basis.

ξ…Ÿ
SESH 1601
February 2024

On arrival at Tribhuvan International Airport in Kathmandu, once you've passed through Immigration and retrieved your luggage, please look out for your Team Mount Everest driver carrying a placard with your name who will transfer you to Hotel Buddy for overnight on bed and breakfast basis.

ξ…Ÿ
SESH 1001
February 2024

On arrival at Tribhuvan International Airport in Kathmandu, once you've passed through Immigration and retrieved your luggage, please look out for your Team Mount Everest driver carrying a placard with your name who will transfer you to Hotel Buddy for overnight on bed and breakfast basis.

ξ…Ÿ
IRPR 1401
December 2023

On arrival at Tribhuvan International Airport in Kathmandu, once you've passed through Immigration and retrieved your luggage, please look out for your Team Mount Everest driver carrying a placard with your name who will transfer you to Hotel Buddy in Kathmandu for overnight on bed and breakfast basis.

ξ…Ÿ
JORE 1401
December 2023

Day 1: On arrival at Tribhuvan International Airport in Kathmandu, once you've passed through Immigration and retrieved your luggage, please look out for your Team Mount Everest driver carrying a placard with your name who will transfer you to Hotel Buddy for overnight on bed and breakfast basis.

ξ…Ÿ

On arrival at Tribhuvan International Airport in Kathmandu, once you've passed through Immigration and retrieved your luggage, please look out for your Team Mount Everest driver carrying a placard with your name who will transfer you to Kathmandu Marriott Hotel for overnight on bed and breakfast basis.

ξ…Ÿ

At high altitudes, it is common to experience acute mountain sickness (AMS). Approximately three-quarters of individuals at elevations above 3,000 metres can expect to encounter mild symptoms. The occurrence of altitude sickness depends on various factors, including elevation, rate of ascent, and individual susceptibility. During the normal process of acclimatisation, many people may experience mild symptoms of altitude sickness. It is important to understand that the mild discomfort accompanying this adaptation is considered normal and acceptable.

ξ…Ÿ

Once you have cleared Immigration and collected your baggage upon arrival at Kathmandu's Tribhuvan International Airport, please keep an eye out for a Team Mount Everest driver holding a sign with your name. The driver will transport you to Hotel Buddy in Kathmandu, where you will spend the night on a bed and breakfast basis.

ξ…Ÿ

Assuming climbers are able to obtain competitive flight fares all the way into Tribhuvan International Airport (KTM) this is almost always the best means of reaching us and getting into position to begin your climb or safari. During the process of booking with us we will request your flight details and will sENd one of our drivers to meet your flight. Our driver will usually be wearing a black Team Mount Everest T-Shirt and carrying a placard with the name of the main correspondent representing your climb group.

ξ…Ÿ

A BMI (Body Mass Index) calculator is a tool used to estimate an individual's body fatness based on their height and weight. It provides a numerical value that indicates whether a person is underweight, normal weight, overweight, or obese. The BMI calculation is based on the principle that a person's weight should be proportionate to their height. To use a BMI calculator, you input your weight and height, and the calculator calculates your BMI by dividing your weight in kilograms by the square of your height in metres. The resulting BMI value is then compared to standard ranges to determine the person's weight category. While BMI is a useful screening tool, it doesn't directly measure body fat percentage or consider factors such as muscle mass or distribution of fat. It serves as a starting point for assessing an individual's weight status and can be a helpful tool in monitoring overall health and weight management.

ξ…Ÿ